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Submitted on
December 10, 2013
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Make
Canon
Model
Canon PowerShot G7
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1/318 second
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F/4.8
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44 mm
Date Taken
Dec 1, 2013, 10:59:44 AM
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GP WASR-10/63 (Pm. Md. 63 BFPU) by Spreewerke GP WASR-10/63 (Pm. Md. 63 BFPU) by Spreewerke
Here is a photograph of my WASR;  US-made follower in the magazine is present for 922r purposes.

Anyway, it's the WASR I've had for a few years.  Last summer I got a set of three Balkan-used furniture sets off of actual military AKs (Romanian Pm. Md. 63s, which the WASR is a clone/variant of).  I mixed and matched all that came in it, and here's the current end-result.  The buttstock has two stripes of electrical tape on it, for whatever reason, as well as a sticker of a Porsche.  Inside the cleaning kit capsule area, the soldier had inserted two small, round...  things.  One looks like the ball bearing from a claymore or other similar anti-personnel device.  Anyway, the pistol grip is worn, but other than that, not much to say.  I have noticed it is thicker than K-Var's US-made pistol grips, however.  The magazine is also something picked up from one of the various Balkan conflicts over the years that I purchased in December of 2012.  Handguards are standard Pm. Md. 63 with a flaking shellac being present on the lower.  I couldn't find my slant-brake muzzle device, so I installed my muzzle nut for the photograph.  As mentioned the rifle itself is a Romanian-made WASR-10 from the Cugir arsenal which Century Arms International later converted back into "non-sporting" configuration once Stateside (GP WASR-10/63).  US-made parts include the trigger group (TAPCO hammer and disconnector, K-Var trigger), gas piston (TAPCO), magazine follower (Arsenal), and the muzzle nut (forget what maker:  probably TAPCO).  Everything else is Romanian, save for the magazine body and spring.  The magazines are still unidentifiable, at least by me, due to them having all the build characteristics of a Yugoslavian/Serbian magazine, but having the regular Soviet/European-style magazine ribs.  The magazine's original follower was Yugoslavian (bolt-hold-open), but many in the shipment received had their followers filed down to act like regular AK magazines.
:iconwikipediauser:
WIKIPEDIAUSER Dec 13, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Woah Rumanian AK
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:iconleonartisan:
Leonartisan Dec 10, 2013  Student General Artist
Did you build this?
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:iconspreewerke:
It is a GP WASR-10/63.  All I did was swap its furniture.
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